AS@W
AS@W Antidepressant Skills at Work: Dealing with Mood Problems in the Workplace
Solving Problems Effectively
Step 1 Choose a Problem

The first step in problem-solving is to choose a problem that may be contributing to your low mood. Sometimes, depressed people have difficulty identifying specific problems – they see everything as one huge problem. Identifying problems you think are worth tackling is quite helpful. It brings you closer to finding realistic answers. One way to identify problems is to pay close attention to how your mood changes through the week, particularly when you are at work. Notice what’s happening when your mood goes down: what were you thinking about, where were you, and what happened just before your mood changed? Changes in your mood can be a helpful guide to show you where the problems are.

Some of your problems might be large ones (for example, “The company is downsizing and has announced that there will be lay-offs”) while some are small (“I want to change my vacation time but I know my supervisor doesn’t like to alter vacation schedules”). Other problems are somewhere in between (“There are a few dozen e-mails I haven’t even looked at in the past week”).

Choose one of the smaller problems happening now. Later, you can move up to larger problems. Try to be specific. For example, “I don’t get enough support in this job” isn’t specific: it’s not clear what the problem is. “I told my boss about a problem I’m having with my job assignment, but she never got back to me” is more specific and makes it clear what is going wrong and what you want to change.


The problem you choose is:

 

 

 

 


 

Sometimes, depressed people have difficulty identifying specific problems – they see everything as one huge problem.

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